FAQ 2017-03-20T14:45:05+00:00

Frequently Asked Questions of Vancouver Paving in Vancouver, WA

How much does paving cost?
How long should I expect to stay off my asphalt?
How do asphalt and concrete compare?
When should I seal my asphalt?
How do I select a good contractor?
How can I avoid “rip-off artist” scams and be an educated consumer?

How much does paving cost?

Most people think that you can price asphalt by the square foot. In actuality, your price can depend on the following:

  1. Size: How large or small your project is.
  2. Slope: Does it have a severe slope (low production.)
  3. Location: Is your project close to the highway.
  4. Base materials: Does the existing need to be removed? Does it need rock? If so, how much rock? How much grading is needed?

These are just a few reasons you should have a professional estimate.

How long should I expect to stay off my asphalt?

Fresh asphalt tends to be pliable; it can scar when first driven on. This does not hurt the integrity of the asphalt, but it does have an impact on the aesthetics. This means you can drive on it a few hours after achieving compaction. This is vital to parking lot owners because they can ill afford to keep their customers from shopping. When it comes to a homeowner’s driveway, they should wait 24 to 48 hours before driving on their new asphalt. When temperatures remain in the 80s and above, you can expect scarring for 30 days. During the first season of your new asphalt, you should support landing legs with plywood.

How do asphalt and concrete compare?

  1. As long as the base material is structurally sound, asphalt will last as long as concrete.
  2. Asphalt, when removed, can be re-used in new asphalt.
  3. Asphalt can be driven on almost immediately, limiting downtime for potential clients or customers.
  4. Asphalt has a bold black finish; this allows it to hide dirt and stains.
  5. Asphalt is less expensive. It also can be repaired and maintained inexpensively.

When should I seal my asphalt?

Seal coating is preventive maintenance. Just like the siding on your home, it should be completed every 3 to 5 years. The initial seal coat should be completed after it’s first winter; however, your asphalt can be sealed after a 30 day cure.

How do I select a good contractor?

Select a contractor that has an established reputation in the community. Get formal written proposals with a firm price. Ensure that the bids have comparable size and material depths that are noted as compacted. Payment upon satisfactory completion is typical.

How can I avoid “rip-off artist” scams and be an educated consumer?

Basic rule, NEVER contract any job on impulse – no matter how good today’s bargain seems to be and avoid the drop by contractor. The “left over material” line. Asphalt is expensive and contractors calculate material carefully and never have enough left over to use on another project. Avoid unit prices like gallons, tons, and square feet without a guaranteed firm price. If the deal sounds too good to be true, it probably is. For further information, go to pavementpro.com.